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Independent Lens: Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes DVD

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Item No.: INLE4816
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Take a fearless look at manhood, sexism, and homophobia in today's hip-hop culture. Conceived as a "loving critique" of disturbing trends in rap music, this acclaimed documentary pays tribute to hip-hop while challenging the rap music industry for glamorizing destructive stereotypes. Features revealing interviews with rappers such as Mos Def and Busta Rhymes, hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons, and cultural commentator Michael Eric Dyson.
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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
PBSIndependent Lens: Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes DVD
 
5.0

(based on 6 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (6)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

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    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

Reviewed by 6 customers

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Displaying reviews 1-5

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5.0

A Time Capsule Classic

By Jamaal

from Atlanta, GA

Verified Reviewer

Comments about PBS Independent Lens: Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes DVD:

You find yourself wanting more. The truth will always set us free

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Excellent coverage of personal values

By Sean

from Normal, Il

Verified Buyer

Comments about PBS Independent Lens: Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes DVD:

This documentary describes the street culture of hip-hop music, and perfectly relates it to personal values of chivalry and respect to others. The self awareness that Byron Hurt brings to the documentary is unparalleled. I use this documentary to teach values to at risk youth. Byron Hurt's documentary is heart-felt and sincere. By using hip-hop icons to explain the culture of hip-hop and it's ambiguity, Hurt touches subjects of sexism and homophobia with the finesse, and wisdom of a true professional.

(0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Real Men

By Chismitty

from Chicago, Il

Verified Reviewer

Comments about PBS Independent Lens: Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes DVD:

So true. It's funny to see men who have the answer for everything, all of sudden get tongue tied when it came to real issues in the minority community. Issues that they have "sold out" and promote for money and fame. Never to admit that they may be morally wrong, but just to walk away!

(0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Brilliant and Necessary

By Mokey Bear

from Berkeley, CA

Verified Reviewer

Comments about PBS Independent Lens: Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes DVD:

The trickle down effect is happening. The positive-ity is heard. Starting with my own family begining to see the light. Thank you

(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Unbelievably sad, but true....

By Avril

from Beverly Hills , Ca.

Comments about PBS Independent Lens: Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes DVD:

My five star rating indicates that the info. given in this show is spot on, but terribly disturbing. I actually caught the tail end of the show but I plan to buy the D.V.D. for my 18 year old son to watch. He is (amongst many things) an aspiring Hip-Hop artist. Seeing this will no doubt solidify what he already knows about this genre of music. His style is more of the M.F. Doom, Tribe Called Quest, etc. I'll try to keep this short , but I have so much to say. For purposes of brevity I'll focus on the main issue I have with these artists. For the most part (maybe not 100%)these artists were raised by single mothers, some of whom they hated and some of whom they adored. For them to degrade, and perpetuate the stereotype that we are still trying to remove, is beyond belief to me. To sell out your race and your women to me is heartless. I have absolutely no respect for them. How dare they put us on display to the world as a spectacle and something to be loathed. I want to say something to sting them, but words seem to fail me now and all I can do is vow to help those in pursuit to change this trend of self-degradation of our community.

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