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Makers: Women Who Make America DVD
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Item No.: MWOM601
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Review the story of how women have helped shape America over the last 50 years through one of the most sweeping social revolutions in our country's history, in pursuit of their rights to a full and fair share of political power, economic opportunity and personal autonomy.
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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
PBSMakers: Women Who Make America DVD
 
4.6

(based on 19 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (17)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (2)

Most Liked Positive Review

 

Not Just for Feminists or Liberals

Fascinating and Informative. You will learn at least one thing (and probably many) that you were never taught in history class or never read in any book.

I caught this...Read complete review

Fascinating and Informative. You will learn at least one thing (and probably many) that you were never taught in history class or never read in any book.

I caught this last night and I learned so much from this documentary. I found it enlightening, and the interviews from all the women (many of them famous) contained very poignant quote and a look back into history through the eyes of powerful women and their personal stories and experiences.

Every time you look at history, it is amazing to see how a certain time period was experienced in so many different ways by different people, and how those experiences led to one culturally significant act.

I have never called myself a liberal or a feminist, but watching this documentary made me understand their point of view, their actions, and their politics so much better than I ever understood them before. It made me wonder, if I had been born in a different time or in a different state would I have considered myself a conservative or would I have been swept up in the movement like many of these women were.

I really appreciated the interviews with conservative women at the time and the impact that they had on the women's rights movement.

Hearing extremely powerful and successful women talk about all the times they were told they couldn't do something because they were female, and knowing that they found a way to succeed anyway was very inspiring.

And hearing these women who fought so hard for equality of the sexes then to now fear that today's women are just going to throw it all away and have to start the fight all over again was eye-opening and disheartening.

I am buying a copy on DVD so that I can share this with all my friends - straight, lesbian, conservative, liberal - I think we can all learn something important about our history through this documentary.

It is so important to see things through someone else's eyes at times - especially if you can't walk in their shoes. It really gives you an understanding of how people live and why they make the choices that they do when you understand more of where they are coming from and what they have experienced. If you feel that politics are too divisive, if you feel that there is an "us" versus "them," you should watch this film. It may make you feel a solidarity with all women and all people once again.

VS

Most Liked Negative Review

 

not a both sides video

The program is modestly named Women Who Make America. Webster could restate this as Women Who Bring into Being America. There is not much of a pretense that this is a balanced history of...Read complete review

The program is modestly named Women Who Make America. Webster could restate this as Women Who Bring into Being America. There is not much of a pretense that this is a balanced history of the women's movement. This is the women's movement speaking of their reinvented selves and revisionist history. While Webster does not define reinvent one possible definition would be to make superficial changes to appear more likable while not making any changes to your core belief system or anything else of substance. Letty Cottin Pogrebin co-founder of MS. Magazine talked in many segments projecting a cheerful, sincere and sweet persona, as did virtually all of the presenters. It is only later that her daughter expresses her feeling that Letty has anger issues that her daughter does not want in her own life. Quite conspicuous by it's absence is the strident anger, male hatred and advocacy research studies. What their advocacy research studies had in common is that none of them were published in scholarly journals for peer review, the results were not duplicated by third party researchers and did not stand up to investigative examination.

Even though there was no mention of past advocacy research studies, there was a number of 'factual' information items in the presentation. Some of the highlights follow: All of the women in the consciousness raising meetings had fathers who browbeat their mothers. That artsy ads showing women's legs in what appears to be women's magazines plays a huge role in encouraging violence against women. In the confines of a man's home, custom decreed, his wife's body belonged to him (alleged to be true in the 1950's). (1970's) There were no laws that defined violence against women. There was no word for battered women. There was no word because it's called "life". Domestic violence was not even whispered about – no one talked about it. The last few sentences imply that there were no laws against domestic violence until the 1970's. The truth is that the first codification of English common law by William Blackstone (1423-80) prohibited violence to wives. By 1870 domestic violence was illegal in almost every state in the USA. Before then wife-beaters were charged with assault and battery.

My great-grandfather was involved in a hunting accident that made it impossible for him support the family. So my grandfather dropped out of the 8th grade and became the 'man' of the family. This was over 100 years ago and the only jobs available were dirty hard jobs that no one wanted to do. He did what had to be done to support his family and insured that all of his younger siblings were able to finish high school. Years later he needed to find a way to send his children to college. Other families in the extended family had the same problem. He organized the extended family to build a house close to the state college. This made it possible for these children to finish college, including my mother. He had honesty, truthfulness and ethics that went to the bone.
Question: How many times did my grandfather reinvent himself?

Reviewed by 19 customers

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(3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

The struggle

By Elizabeth

from Oceanside, CA

Verified Reviewer

Comments about PBS Makers: Women Who Make America DVD:

I started in the automotive parts business in 1973, back when women did not do that. The women who are in my age bracket struggled and struggled for fairness and equality that they young women of today take for granted. It is sad how so many for get what it was like and do not fully comprehend and appreciate all of us who faught the fight for all to enjoy.

(5 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

For All

By Fleming617

from Boston, MA

Comments about PBS Makers: Women Who Make America DVD:

Equality and "Makers" is not about "left v. right," as some reviewers here would have you believe. It's about the women who fought so hard so that we women today - no matter our beliefs - have opportunities. Women = human.

I am thankful for all women, even those whose views differ from my own. Makers has actually revived me and reminded me how far we've come yet how far we still have to go.

(0 of 11 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

One sided

By Mary T.

from Schaumburg, IL

Verified Reviewer

Comments about PBS Makers: Women Who Make America DVD:

Definitely disappointed. There are women from both sides who make a difference. You wouldn't know it from watching this show. Only really shows contributions from women on the left. Very disappointing.

(3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

What an incredible film!

By RadioFlyer

from Greenbelt, MD

Verified Reviewer

Comments about PBS Makers: Women Who Make America DVD:

I was completely blown away by this documentary when I saw it on t.v. earlier this year. I immediately bought the DVD because I had seen it out of sequence, and I just watched it again. For those of us who were active in the women's movement in the 1960s and '70s, this film brings so much of it back to life and awakens so many memories. There are, of course, things that are missing, and in most respects this is pretty mainstream. But I'm amazed at how much is included and how representative it is, while at the same time being very entertaining. Bravo to the Makers of the film!

(4 of 27 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

not a both sides video

By Arthur G.

from Roswell, NM

Verified Reviewer

Comments about PBS Makers: Women Who Make America DVD:

The program is modestly named Women Who Make America. Webster could restate this as Women Who Bring into Being America. There is not much of a pretense that this is a balanced history of the women's movement. This is the women's movement speaking of their reinvented selves and revisionist history. While Webster does not define reinvent one possible definition would be to make superficial changes to appear more likable while not making any changes to your core belief system or anything else of substance. Letty Cottin Pogrebin co-founder of MS. Magazine talked in many segments projecting a cheerful, sincere and sweet persona, as did virtually all of the presenters. It is only later that her daughter expresses her feeling that Letty has anger issues that her daughter does not want in her own life. Quite conspicuous by it's absence is the strident anger, male hatred and advocacy research studies. What their advocacy research studies had in common is that none of them were published in scholarly journals for peer review, the results were not duplicated by third party researchers and did not stand up to investigative examination.

Even though there was no mention of past advocacy research studies, there was a number of 'factual' information items in the presentation. Some of the highlights follow: All of the women in the consciousness raising meetings had fathers who browbeat their mothers. That artsy ads showing women's legs in what appears to be women's magazines plays a huge role in encouraging violence against women. In the confines of a man's home, custom decreed, his wife's body belonged to him (alleged to be true in the 1950's). (1970's) There were no laws that defined violence against women. There was no word for battered women. There was no word because it's called "life". Domestic violence was not even whispered about – no one talked about it. The last few sentences imply that there were no laws against domestic violence until the 1970's. The truth is that the first codification of English common law by William Blackstone (1423-80) prohibited violence to wives. By 1870 domestic violence was illegal in almost every state in the USA. Before then wife-beaters were charged with assault and battery.

My great-grandfather was involved in a hunting accident that made it impossible for him support the family. So my grandfather dropped out of the 8th grade and became the 'man' of the family. This was over 100 years ago and the only jobs available were dirty hard jobs that no one wanted to do. He did what had to be done to support his family and insured that all of his younger siblings were able to finish high school. Years later he needed to find a way to send his children to college. Other families in the extended family had the same problem. He organized the extended family to build a house close to the state college. This made it possible for these children to finish college, including my mother. He had honesty, truthfulness and ethics that went to the bone.
Question: How many times did my grandfather reinvent himself?

Displaying reviews 1-5

Back to top

Previous | Next »