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FRONTLINE: Nuclear Aftershocks DVD
List Price: $24.99
Our Price: $19.99

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Item No.: FRL63006
Single DVD

FRONTLINE correspondent Miles O'Brien examines the implications of Japan's Fukushima accident for U.S. nuclear safety, and asks how this disaster will affect the future of nuclear energy around the world. In particular, he visits one emerging battleground: The controversial relicensing of the Indian Point nuclear plant, located only 38 miles from Manhattan. What lessons can be learned from the disaster in Japan?
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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
PBSFRONTLINE: Nuclear Aftershocks DVD
 
4.5

(based on 2 reviews)

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(1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

The details you didn't hear

By John in Michigan

from Rochester, Michigan

Verified Buyer

Comments about PBS FRONTLINE: Nuclear Aftershocks DVD:

Reports on the Fukushima disaster are incomplete and often contradictory. Frontline fixes that by presenting a solid story told through interviews conducted by a single reporter -- and lots of video. Some scenes look like they were taken from an SF disaster film. Animations clarify details that cannot be seen. This is a well made DVD program that will make you the local expert on the matter.

(0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

 
4.0

Truly shocking....

By shewes

from Windham, CT

Verified Buyer

Comments about PBS FRONTLINE: Nuclear Aftershocks DVD:

Difficult questions face our world of ever-higher rates of energy consumption. Is nuclear energy still a viable option? The Germans don't think so; should we?

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